Category Archives: Christmas

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic, Fire and Dispatch personnel – Merry Christmas 2014

First, I again want to say thank you to all the Chiefs, Sheriffs, Officers, Administrators, and fellow Chaplains who have made it possible for me to distribute this message.

I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. For those of you in stations or cars working during the holidays, we appreciate the sacrifices you and your family are making while ensuring our safety and security. It does not go unappreciated or unnoticed.

If anything marks the holidays, it’s a sense of gratitude (hopefully). I know that we sometimes see the worst that society has to offer, and the holidays may seem like anything but gratitude. But what I’m coming to know more and more as I get older, that gratitude can be anywhere, and will be there when you least expect it. Sometimes you just have to know where to look. Just like most people, I can get disappointed, agitated, disillusioned, or just plan cynical. Sometimes we have bad days. Today, as I write this email, it was a bad day for me. Horrible really. But then took time to read a card I got in the mail. It was from a dispatcher far away from where I live who read my email and took the time to reply and it turned my day around (and if that person reads this before you get my reply, it is coming!).

So what do we do when we get to the end of the year and our “tank is empty” so to speak?

  1. Count your blessings  – A wise person challenged me to do a gratitude jar recently. So you get this jar and every time something good happens to you, you scribble it down and put it in the jar. Someone buy your lunch? Out it in the jar. Someone shook your hand at the gas station? Put it in the jar. Find a $5 bill in a parking lot? Put it in the jar. Then when you have those bad days, look at the jar. Maybe even read some. Use than money to buy your lunch.
  2. Open your eyes – If you tell me nothing good ever happens to you, or that no one ever cares, I challenge you to look closer. It might not happen every day but I bet that more happens than we notice! And the mid has a funny way of working. If you start noticing even the small things over the next few weeks, guess what will happen. You will see more good things than before.
  3. Don’t wait for big things – Some people wait forever for their “ship to come in” and it never does, so they get disillusioned. Life is too short. Take note of the small things. If you wait your whole life to win the lottery, you will be passing up so many good things that others would give anything for.
  4. Have “A Person” – Have someone in your life that can call you out when you are in a dark place. I have a few that can do that. When I start the “woe is me” they get to tell me what I am failing to see. Let me be honest, no one likes being called out. But it just might help you see how good things really are.

In closing, I know that some of you think that this is all crazy. You “live in the real world”. Maybe you don’t see anything good in your life right now. Just give what I said a try. What do you have to lose? If I’m wrong then all you are out is a few minutes and a dollar for a jar. But, if I’m right, you can be happier this time next year.

During the holidays, I always put in this information, because I know that someone may need it. The holidays are meant to be times of joy, happiness, time with those we love and hope. While it can produce stress for even the best of us, for some of you can be a time of sadness, frustration or depression. It can be hard to balance out what you have to deal with and still know that there are great people in society as well. I also know that it’s hard for us to reach out sometimes (and I’m no exception to this rule). If you find yourself struggling in this holiday season, don’t hesitate to reach out for assistance. Your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, and any other Supervisor available for help. There is also other Clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. My phone is always on and I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can. Call us, grab us after roll call, send an email. Reach out if you need to.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and best wishes for 2015. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Advertisements

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic and Fire personnel – Merry Christmas

First, I again want to say thank you to all the Chiefs, Sheriffs, Officers, Administrators, and fellow Chaplains who have made it possible for me to distribute this message.

I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and Happy Holiday season. For those of you in stations or cars working during the holidays, we appreciate the sacrifices you and your family are making while ensuring our safety and security. It does not go unappreciated or unnoticed.

It’s that time of the year again. The Holidays can be a source of wonderful joy. I look forward every year to having some down time, spending time with my family, and going back to my home town to see more of my family. And there’s always a stop (or two or three!) at a police station or fire house to spread more of my support.  It’s a time of traditions. Most of us have them, though yours and mine are likely different. I know that some of you reading this will be working those days. Some of you volunteered so the department newlywed can have that first Christmas with his new bride or the new father with his newborn on Christmas morning. Some of you will be busy at work when I crawl out of bed on Christmas morning, or will hear the tones drop multiple times that night. Some of you will do it in freezing temperatures, and others will do it in warm ones. You will change your holiday schedule and family time around your work, and may not even think about it because “That’s what I do.” As a Chaplain, I’ve been privileged to see some of what goes on “behind the scenes”. I hear the stories and see the sacrifice. Lots of us do. Don’t ever forget that. But if you do, you know where to find me. So, do Doc a favor this Christmas. Have a great time. Be with people you love during the Holidays. Find some time to relax. Do something that makes YOU happy. Sit and enjoy some warm cocoa, or a cold drink (a good raspberry tea is my drink of choice) and enjoy it. You deal with the bad enough. Find some good and soak in as much as you can.

During the holidays, I always put in this information, because I know that someone may need it. The holidays are meant to be times of joy, happiness, time with those we love and hope. While it can produce stress for even the best of us, for some of you can be a time of sadness, frustration or depression. It can be hard to balance out what you have to deal with and still know that there are great people in society as well. I also know that it’s hard for us to reach out sometimes (and I’m no exception to this rule). If you find yourself struggling in this holiday season, don’t hesitate to reach out for assistance. Your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, and any other Supervisor available for help. There is also other Clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. My phone is always on and I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can. Call us, grab us after roll call, send an email. Reach out if you need to.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and best wishes for 2014. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic and Fire personnel – Merry Christmas

First, I again want to say thank you to all the Chiefs, Sheriffs, Officers, Administrators, and fellow Chaplains who have made it possible for me to distribute this message.

I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and Happy Holiday season. For those of you in stations or cars working during the holidays, we appreciate the sacrifices you and your family are making while ensuring our safety and security. It does not go unappreciated or unnoticed.

As we finish 2012 and prepare for 2013, there are numerous things we are having to do. For those of us in the cold weather climates, you may be checking, repairing, or purchasing cold weather gear. Then there is the Christmas shopping for family and friends. Then there is the arranging to cover the shifts at work. Who is working Christmas Morning? You may be cramming those visits to doctors or dentists since you have already met your deductibles for the year. You might be pulling in all the overtime you can. You may also be making plans with multiple families scheduled around your shift and rotations. It can be the most hectic time of the year. Add our potential job stress on top of that. Increases in domestic violence, fires, homicides, accidents, and suicides. So how can we enjoy “The Holidays” with all that stress? Here are a few ideas I have come up with.

– I’m a big stickler for finding time for yourself, so more than ever, make time for you. Big or small. For example, I go to the same place to eat every Thursday for lunch and get the same thing. It allows me to decompress and just relax.
– Have a child read you a story. Find one with words outside of their age range. Sometimes helping a child through words like “Caesar Augustus” or what a “clatter” is and why it would arise on the lawn can bring a smile to your heart.
– Attend a play put on by children.
– Give a stranger a gift.
– Give someone a random compliment.
– Work out. Raising your heartbeat and taking time to zone out with exercise helps relieve stress, anxiety, and tension that can be so prevalent around the holidays.
– Have some Dark Chocolate. Aside from its fat-burning properties and antioxidants, savoring a piece of dark chocolate can help release soothing serotonin hormones in your brain to help better your mood.
– Make a list of things you can be thankful for.

These things may not change the world, but it could improve yours, and that’s what’s really important.

During the holidays, I always put in this information. That the holidays “can be a time of sadness, frustration or depression. It can be hard to balance out what you have to deal with and still know that there are great people in society as well.” True as it may be, it’s hard for us to reach out sometimes. If you find yourself struggling in this holiday season, don’t hesitate to reach out for assistance. Your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, any other Supervisor, Clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. My phone is always on and I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can. Call us, grab us after roll call, send an email. Reach out if you need to.

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and best wishes for 2013. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

My Christmas Eve – Retired OSP Trooper Bob Welsh

This poem comes from Retired OSP Trooper Bob Welsh. Trooper Welsh is an inspirational speaker after his retirement, and tells a story like I have never heard before.
You Tube


My Christmas Eve
By Bob Welsh

The hours late, should go to bed
Near midnight I believe
But memories keep me wide awake
This snowy Christmas Eve

Yes, memories of my kids moved on
Each has their separate life
And how the holidays have changed
Since angels took my wife

The toys, the food, the Christmas cheer
My wife would bear the load
Because I work most holidays
State Trooper on the road

Just sitting in my easy chair
So many years retired
I reminisce of times gone by
And all that has transpired

Of all the many happenings
That seem to come to light
A multitude of them occurred
Right on this very night

A drunken woman in a wreck
Died on Christmas eve
Leaves memories of a tragic case
Most people won’t believe

I had to drive to where she lived
To tell her next of kin
And found the rundown mobile home
She had been living in

The person answering the door
I still recall today
A little girl about four years old
She said “I’m Sue McKay”

I asked her if her dad was home
And felt the longest pause
She said “My daddy ran away”
“You must be Santa Claus”

“My mommy said you’d come tonight”
“If I just stayed in bed”
“And bring a pretty doll for me”
“That’s what my mommy said”

I broke the law that Christmas Eve
Did not call child’s care
They’d merely put her in a room
And that I could not bear

I picked her up and took her home
My wife tucked her in bed
And wrapped a pretty doll for her
Just like her mommy said

Adopted by a loving home
And soon they moved away
I won’t forget that Christmas Eve
And little Sue McKay

Another bitter Christmas Eve
A blizzard to behold
Had left a family in a ditch
Just trapped there in the cold

By grace of God I spotted them
All cold and guant with fright
I drove them to a motel room
To safely spend the night

One Christmas Eve a homeless man
Shivering and wet
Was trying hard to get a ride
I’m sure he’d never get

I picked him up and drove him
To a diner on the hill
To warm his bones I left him with
a five dollar bill

Strange how when your all alone
What memories you recall
Your think of everything you’ve done
And was it worth it all

I think about my God, my job
My children and my wife
Would I do it all the same
Could I re-live my life

Then comes a knock upon my door
This late who could it be
A neighbor or has Santa Claus
Come to visit me

The figure standing in the cold
Gives me a sudden fright
A trooper with that solemn look
Dear God, who has died tonight

I’m flashing back to bygone years
How I’d often stood
On someones porch to bring them news
And it was never good

Is this how life gets back at me
For misery I’ve induced
Where pain I’ve caused some other folks
Has now come home to roost

But looking in the troopers eyes
My mind is in a whirl
I see a pleasant countenance
The trooper is a girl

She reached and smiled to shake my hand
And silence wasn’t broke
Until a tear rolled down her cheek
And then she softly spoke

“I’m sure you don’t remember me”
“But thought I’d stop and say”
“God bless you on this Christmas Eve”
“I’m Trooper Sue McKay”

Help needed for a former LEO/kids – Cancer

I had this sent to me by a friend of mine. I know it’s Christmas and times might be tight, but please, if you can help. It may be his last Christmas with his kids.


Hello Friends!

I am writing you because one of our former brothers in blue needs our help. He would never ask for help himself, but I was able to get him to give me the ok to put this out there for his two children. William “Billie” Helpinstine, Former Deputy at Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office and Park Ranger at Five Rivers Metro Parks is in desperate need of help this Holiday Season. He was diagnosed with liver & pancreatic cancer almost a year ago and was given a very negative prognosis. He has been unemployed for many months now and unable to work due to his health condition. He has two children: Angel and Alex. Angel is 7 and Alex is 5. Without any help these children will not have a very Merry Christmas this year and soon will be without their dad. Alex is very much into Spiderman and Angel loves Barbies. They both like books, puzzles, and board games. If anyone is interested I can also get their clothing sizes.

I am going to be collecting gifts for Bill’s children and gift cards for food (Kroger), and gas cards. I would like to have a few people or whomever wants to help or deliver their gifts themselves, meet me at the old K-Mart Lot on Dec 22, 2011 at 6:30 P.M. to drive to the Helpinstine Residence (Which is near by) to play Santa for the family. If anyone has a Santa Suit and would like to volunteer to play Santa or an Elf that would be super too. Sorry for the short notice but Bill is a very proud person and didn’t let us know of his condition until now.

If you have any questions please call me anytime: Shawn Baab at 937-604-0686 or Email me at ShawnBaab@Gmail.Com.

Let’s make this Christmas special for the Helpinstines!!

The Facebook event is located here.

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic and Fire personnel – Merry Christmas

First, I again want to say thank you to all the Chiefs, Sheriffs, Officers and Administrators who have made it possible for me to distribute this message.

I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and Happy Holiday season. Some of you may be working during the holidays, or even on Christmas day. I want you to know we appreciate the sacrifices you and your family are making while ensuring our safety and security. It does not go unnoticed or unappreciated.

Some of you may see a darker side to this holiday than the rest of us will see. Called to separate fights, deal with shoplifters, provide attention to someone injured, or worse. Domestics and related injuries are up during the holidays. So it’s my hope that you get to spend time with families and friends and see the true meaning of the holiday season. I hope and pray that the dark side of the holidays will not keep you from seeing and experiencing the great times that come with the holidays.

In a time of giving of gifts, I would like to pose a question for each of you. We all think about giving gifts, but do we take time to think about being gifts? What do you do with the gift you ARE? You are a gift to someone. Families, friends, co-workers, or members of the communities. What gift can you provide? Just being there for someone to talk to? Giving the new trainee some extra words of wisdom for the holidays? Being a source of encouragement for those around you?

And, as I’ve noted before, the holidays can be a time of sadness, frustration or depression. It can be hard to balance out what you have to deal with and still know that there are great people in society as well. If you find yourself struggling in this holiday season, don’t hesitate to reach out for assistance. Your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, any other Supervisor, clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can. Call us, grab us after roll call, send an email. Reach out if you need to.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic and Fire personnel – Merry Christmas

First, I want to say thank you to all the Chiefs, Sheriffs and administrators who have made it possible for me to distribute this message.

This marks the second Christmas season that I have sent out emails. In 2008, I decided that no Police Officer, Paramedic, or Fire Fighter will ever serve, protect and defend through a holiday and not know that they are appreciated by someone. As I reflect on the experiences that have come from doing this, I must say that my life is fuller because of it. For those of you who I have met personally, rode in a car with, and celebrated birthdays with, it’s been some really good times. And as I continue my mission to make sure you feel appreciated, I look forward to meeting and spending time with more of you.

I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and Happy Holiday Season. I know most of you will be working during the holidays. Whether you are dispatching, in a patrol car, or a fire truck, you will spend part of the holidays away from your family. A lot of people do not understand that kind of sacrifice and dedication. You are out there keeping us safe so we can have a happy holiday season with our families. You are out in the cold, the rain, snow, driving to work while most people are sleeping in, or celebrating with family and friends.

I want to say, THANK YOU. Words can not express the gratitude that I have. But not just myself. Don’t forget that there are lots of other people who feel that way. You just may not hear it. I think that is unfortunate that you do not hear it more often than you do, but thank you. Thank you for putting on a uniform everyday. Thank you for being ready to answer a call, even on Christmas. Thank you for checking those hoses, shining those trucks or checking that light bar, and strapping on your duty belt. Those mundane tasks that you do everyday, now on one of the most important holidays of the year. Thank you. As my family sits down to our dinner, or open our gifts, know that you will be thought of at that time, and your sacrifices honored. Please express my appreciation for you to your families.

And, as I’ve noted before, the holidays can be a time of sadness, frustration or depression. It can be hard to balance out what you have to deal with and still know that there are great people in society as well. If you find yourself struggling in this holiday season, don’t hesitate to reach out for assistance. Your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, any other Supervisor, clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can. Call us, grab us after roll call, send an email. Reach out if you need to.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.