Category Archives: Police Week

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel – Police Week 2016

As always, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I cannot express my gratitude enough for your assistance. I also want to thank you, the reader. While I can’t visit with each of you individually, I can, however, remind and show you that people DO care. This message is being read by departments of all shapes, sizes and locations. To each of you, welcome. I know you’re busy and you do a lot to get ready for your shift. So thank you for reading and I hope it will be beneficial to you.

May 11-17, 2016 marks the period that we call “Police Week”.  In 1962, President Kennedy designated May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day, when we set aside a time of “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”. I, like a lot of you, will attend memorials or private ceremonies. Some of you may just gather together to reminisce about our fallen comrades. Most of us will do something so we remember them and never forget what they have done for us.

As Cicero wrote, “The life of the dead is placed in the memory of the living.” During this time, I think it is fitting to ask ourselves “What am I doing to bring honor to their memory?” The way I look at it, I’m the product of many people back in my family tree.  I could be dramatically different, or maybe not even be here today if one of those couples had not met. I might not think the same; feel the same, like the same things. So I feel that I owe it to them, to my family, both here and no longer living, to be the best version of me that I can. The harsh reality of that, however, is that some days I live up to that, and some days I don’t.

So how does that affect us in our career? How do we bring honor to those who have come before us in our career? Here are a couple of thoughts that I think may help us do that.

1) Live life to the fullest.  This means different things to different people. Donate time to a church or charity. Volunteer in the neighborhood or homeless shelter. Play basketball with the neighborhood kids. Attend a 12 step program or finally kick that habit that has been a thorn in your side.  Maybe start a group workout.  Help someone with a hobby you have in common.

2) Never stop growing. Life is an unending series of changes. Make some on your terms. Never stop training. Never stop learning. Read a book, take some training time, learn another language, skill or talent.

3) Tell the stories for those that came before us. Those that are just starting their careers need to hear the stories of those that came before us. Why do we do things a certain way? There is probably a good reason, find it and tell the story. That guy who told great jokes when someone was having a tough day, tell his story. Share the stories of those officers that your department has on a memorial wall. Set aside a day in the memory of an officer to do special events in your community, or to the less fortunate.

4) Learn from costly lessons. Some of the changes in the way we do things are learned by sacrifices of those before us, like seat belts, vests, back up weapons, traffic stop safety etc. Learn their stories, share them, and motivate yourself and others to prevent the deaths and injuries we can prevent by heeding those lessons. When we attach a name and face to something, we work together to prevent it from happening again. Take those accidents from the realm of “statistics” or something that happens somewhere else and allow it to motivate us to help one person at a time, maybe that officer that may be in roll call with us next time.

For all law enforcement reading this, I’m praying for a peaceful and safe week for you: safe traffic stops, safe building searches, and safe DV calls. I pray for a time of healing for the departments reading this who have had a loss in the last year, or with a loss that continues to hurt. I pray that those of you making trips to Washington and state memorials will have a safe trip. For those who are attending a memorial to honor a fallen brother or sister, I pray for healing. But most of all, I hope now more than ever, there is an outpouring of appreciation form the communities that you serve.

In closing, thank you for who you are, and all you do. I’ve said it before and will say it for the remainder of my days. You all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

 

Dr. Mike A. Crain I, D.Min.
Chaplain
Huber Heights, OH 45424
Blog: https://chaplainthoughts.wordpress.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DoctorMichael

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Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel – Police Week 2015

As always, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I cannot express my gratitude enough for your assistance. I also want to thank you, the reader. While I can’t visit with each of you individually, I can, however, remind and show you that people DO care. This message is being read by departments of all shapes and sizes. To each of you, welcome. I know you’re busy and you do a lot to get ready for your shift. So thank you for reading.

May 10-16 this year is Police Week. It was designated by President Kennedy in “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”. Some of us will go to memorials, or private ceremonies, or just sitting around reminiscing about our fallen comrades. Most of us do something so we remember, so we never forget. As Cicero wrote, “The life of the dead is placed in the memory of the living.” I encourage you to take time to remember.

There has been so many events occurred over the past year, and I’m sure I don’t need to mention most of them. They are common names and places now, that one year ago most of us had not heard of. I wanted to use this note to share some insight I have been given. Insight that some of you reading this note have given me over the last year. Some of you reading this have shared your thoughts, hurts, anger and frustrations. You are under a spotlight more than ever. Some of you feel that your job is hated, or no longer matters. You feel that the average citizen does not notice, or worse, does not care. I have heard from officers in different places about the environment we find ourselves in. Public opinion is brutal, and unfortunately for us it’s been turned in our direction. So here are some things I want you to remember:

1) Eventually some (if not a lot) of the negativity will die down. There will likely always be some that will cause us heartaches or headaches. But it will get better. Humans go in cycles, and people will movie on to other things.

2) Stay strong, prepared, and optimistic. It’s my mission to help people not lose hope, even though it would be easy to do given the times. Keep training. Keep doing those extra checks. Keep “sharpening your saw”. Keep doing what you do. Tell a joke or two in roll call. I was on a ride along with a department, and the supervisor bought pizza for all of us. I thought it was great. It’s the little things in life that keep us going sometimes. So don’t neglect them.

3) You still have a lot of support, perhaps more than you think. There are thousands and thousands who support Law Enforcement, but maybe not as vocal as some of us. Just keep doing what you do, and the support will rally around you when you need it. Just don’t be afraid to ask.

4) Your role in society is just as important as it ever was. Maybe it’s even MORE important. Sometimes all of us look at our jobs and question “Is it worth it?” But in today’s environment, this one can be hard to remember. You are the ones who keep us safe from the evils in society. You are the sheepdogs keeping the wolves at bay, away from the sheep.

5) Don’t forget your support network. Maybe you were just on the receiving end of someone’s verbal abuse (or worse). Find someone who can remind you that everyone is not like that. Maybe you were on the receiving end of someone’s generosity. Share it. Bring those cards from that kindergarten class in to work. Someone bought you lunch, or the new K9 unit some dog treats, then talk about that. If you have good stories, share them on social media. Talk to your chaplain. If your department doesn’t have one, find out if a someone close to you does.

For all the law enforcement reading this, I’m praying for a peaceful and safe week for you. Safe traffic stops. Safe building searches. Safe DV calls. I pray for a time of healing for the departments reading this who have had a loss in the last year. I pray that those of you making trips to Washington and state memorials will have a safe trip. For those who are attending a memorial to honor a fallen brother or sister, I pray for healing. But most of all, I hope now more than ever, there is an outpouring of appreciation form the communities that you serve.

In closing, thank you for all you do. I’ve said it before and will say it for the remainder of my days. You all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel – Police Week 2014

As always, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I cannot express my gratitude enough for your assistance. I also want to thank you, the reader. I can’t personally shake your hands or buy you lunch. I can, however, let you know that people DO care. This message is being read by departments of all shapes and sizes. To each of you, welcome. I know you’re busy and you do a lot to get ready for your shift. So thank you for reading.

May 11-17 this year is Police Week. It was designated by President Kennedy in “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”. We are going into a time of remembrance. There will be local, state and national memorials. Locations may vary from the front of the building, in restaurants, pubs or the national memorial in Washington D.C. It’s a time to remember our fallen and to honor their courage and sacrifice. I think one of the best way to honor them, is to live better lives ourselves.

I was watching a video last week where a motivational speaker was talking about the speech below. It is a quote from President Theodore Roosevelt, and I think it is very fitting for you to remember. You have a job where you are constantly second-guessed by the public. So read this quote and let it soak in.

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

I’ve been privileged to see some of the “inner workings” of what goes on, good and bad. But you are out there doing the job every day. You are out there in the “dust and sweat and blood” doing what you do best. And the secret that some of you don’t let out is this: Sometimes the dragon wins. Sometimes despite out best efforts, things go wrong. Despite all the efforts, there are still DUI’s, meth labs and domestics to go to. But do you give up? No way! You keep pushing back the darkness. You keep attacking evil, even in its home court! You keep going to the same house and pulling someone out who is high, drunk or beating on someone else. You keep up the pressure. That’s what I call someone who “spends himself in a worthy cause”. We might never see the end of the evil that people inflict on others, but that doesn’t keep us from fighting, and that’s why you are amazing.

In closing, some of you will be heading to Washington for the National Memorial, and I hope for a safe trip. Others are going because you know someone being added to the wall. My thoughts and prayers are with you for safety, as well as healing. But for all of you, I hope and pray that not only will the week be safe, but the rest of the year as well. I hope there is an outpouring of appreciation from the communities that you serve.

In closing, thank you for all you do. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel – Police Week 2013

As always, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I cannot express my gratitude enough for your assistance. I also want to thank you, the reader. I can’t personally shake your hands or buy you lunch. I can, however, let you know that people DO care. This message is being read by departments of all shapes and sizes. To each of you, welcome. I know you’re busy and you do a lot to get ready for your shift. So thank you for reading.

May 12-18 this year is Police Week. It was designated by President Kennedy in “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”.

In this note, I want to talk to you briefly about something that we all have in common, and few of us want to talk about, pain.

I read a wise statement once and it was “Knowing that there is worse pain doesn’t make present pain hurt any less.” We all experience pain at some level. Be it physical, emotional, or relational, no pain is more real than another, though it may be more defined. It may give a perspective or context, but just knowing that someone has a broken arm does not make the stubbed toe hurt any less.

Pain is something that we are aware of. Most of us have had to witness pain as part of our duties. From car accidents and cardiac arrests, burglaries to house fires. Some of you may have chronic physical or emotional pain. And for those of you that have given a death notification, you know just what I mean, pain is all around us.

So what do we do in a world full of pain? How can we keep the “spring in our step” with pain in our mind or bodies?

1) Understand that “being tough” is not always the answer.
2) Take time to decompress. I’ve said this before. Take time for you. I know we have busy schedules and numerous commitments, but if you are always running on empty, you’re not doing anyone a favor, including yourself.
3) Get proper rest, exercise and have a proper diet. Every doctor will advise this. Also, as most of us know, this is not always easy. Make gradual changes that you can stick with instead of numerous major changes. Those will be more effective.
4) Get involved in support groups. This can be helpful with physical pain as well as emotional. When you’re with people who have chronic pain and understand what you’re going through, you can benefit from their wisdom in coping with the pain.
5) Get a good massage.
6) Have someone you can speak to about ANYTHING, and be willing to listen. They may tell you something you may not want to hear.
7) If you need help…ASK.

Lastly, do Doc a favor, (well 2 actually).
1) Never minimize anther’s pain because you think yours is more real.
2) Even with your pain (or in spite of it), reach out to someone you see in pain.
It may not change the world, but it will improve theirs, and yours.

For all the law enforcement reading this, I’m praying for a peaceful week for you. Safe traffic stops. I hope people see you in restaurants and pay for your food. I pray for a time of healing for the departments reading this who have had a loss in the last year. I pray that those of you making the trip to Washington will have a safe trip. For those who are attending a memorial to honor a fallen brother or sister, I pray for safety and healing. But most of all, I hope there is an outpouring of appreciation form the communities that you serve.

In closing, thank you for all you do. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

I never dreamed it would be me

I never dreamed it would be me,
my name for all eternity, recorded
here at the hallowed place, alas,
my name, no more my face.

“In the line of duty” I hear them say,
my family now the price to pay,
my folded flag stained with their tears,
we only had those few short years.

The badge no longer on my chest,
I sleep now in eternal rest, my sword
I pass to those behind, and pray they
keep this thought in mind.

I never dreamed it would be me,
and with heavy heart and bended knee,
I ask for all here from the past;
Dear God, let my name be the last.

George Hahn, Los Angeles Police Department, Retired

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel – Police Week 2012

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel.

First, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I can not express my gratitude enough for your assistance.

To the officers out there taking your time to read it, thank you. It’s always my sincere hope when you take your valuable time to read my notes, that you receive some encouragement from the words that I write. That you know that there are people who support you and stand with you when you confront evil in it’s various forms.

May 13-19 this year is Police Week. It was designated by President Kennedy in “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”.

On one of the walls in the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington DC we find a quote from the Roman historian Tacitus, “In Valor, There Is Hope.” What exactly is “valor”? The dictionary defines it as “courage or bravery, especially in battle “. So what does that mean for you?

I’ve been privileged with the opportunity to “ride along” with various officers from different departments. I’ve seen some of the “battle” that goes on in our communities, and the roles you play. I’ve seen courage and bravery displayed by officers. I’ve witnessed officers patrolling streets in tornado ravaged cities, working to make sure their city is not taken advantage of, even when they are worried about their own families. I’ve seen the running toward the “robbery in progress”. I’ve seen the knocking on the door of the domestic violence call. I’ve been in the car that started having mechanical problems, but we headed back to a problem area because “I can’t leave my partner behind.” I could give numerous other scenarios, but I’ll be brief.

You may not face a gun everyday, but it’s possible. You may not get called to a domestic that could go bad, but it’s possible. You may not be posed with danger everyday, but it’s possible. It’s possible, yet you put on the uniform and go out there anyway, trusting your instincts, your partner and your training. It may not seem like a big deal (you’ve told me “It’s just my job”), but it is. You are there for us, and even if you never hear it from anyone else, I say “Thank You”, I say that your dedication and service is appreciated.

Some of you will be heading to Washington for the National Memorial, and I hope for a safe trip. Others are going because you know someone being added to the wall. My thoughts and prayers are with you for safety, as well as healing.

But for all of you, I hope and pray that not only will the week be safe, but the rest of the year as well. I hope there is an outpouring of appreciation form the communities that you serve.

In closing, thank you for all you do. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel – Police Week 2011

As always, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I cannot express my gratitude enough for your assistance. I also want to thank you, the reader. I cannot personally give you a pat on the back or buy you lunch. However, I can let you know that people DO care.

May 15-21 this year is Police Week. It was designated by President Kennedy in “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”.

During this note, I would like to talk a bit about significance. Significance can be a very broad term, and like beauty, it can be in “the eye of the beholder”. Actions that I take may or may not be viewed as significant to employers, friends, or family; even though I think they are significant. The adverse is also true. Something that I think is insignificant may be very significant to someone else.

So how does that affect you as a Police Officer? I have ridden with and heard from numerous officers who fight this battle. They feel unappreciated. They feel that the community is looking for reasons to harp on them. Bottom line – they do not feel significant.

We as humans don’t have the full picture. What you see as giving directions to a lost motorist, may have enabled them to see a loved one for the last time, or the birth of a new child. By giving that kid at McDonalds a sticker or a toy badge, may have given them their first view of a cop – and made a supporter for life. Checking in on the dog bite victim even after your part of the case is done, showed that little boy that cops need not be feared, but are there to help. The little things that we consider insignificant may not have changed the world, but it changed someone’s world. Whether you are in a small town, big city, or something in between, you have likely made impact on people you are not aware of, and possibly may never know. So I want to encourage you as you read this.

I could go on for pages about why your job is significant, and why YOU are significant. But you have things to do, so I tried to be brief (If you’d like me to expound further drop me a note). For all the officers out there reading this, Dr. Mike is praying for a peaceful week for you. Safe traffic stops. I hope people see you in restaurants and pay for your food. I pray for a time of healing for the departments reading this who have had a loss in the last year. I pray that those of you making the trip to Washington will have a safe trip. For those who are making the trip to the wall to honor a fallen brother, I pray for safety and healing. But most of all, I hope there is an outpouring of appreciation form the communities that you serve.

In closing, thank you for all you do. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.