Category Archives: sheriff

My thoughts – Clark County LOD – Deputy Sheriff Suzanne Hopper

Today is a dark day in the Miami Valley, particularly for Clark County. The CCSO had not lost an officer in the Line of Duty (LOD) since 1978. And this one was shot while TAKING A PICTURE OF A FOOTPRINT. I did not know her. Some of you reading this note may have. I’ve heard it say that she was a fine person, and a fine officer. Now, we have another taken from us. Officers across the Miami Valley (and Nationwide) are grieving tonight. Taken, doing what she loved, and taken protecting the citizens of Clark County. I’ve never been a cop. So I can’t tell you how it feels to have someone you know and talk to cut down in their prime my someone who doesn’t have the decency to fight fair, but shoots her in the back.

I’ve seen the Thin Blue Line in action…and closer than alot of people. I’ve heard the complaints, and witnessed what some of you do at traffic stops. And I’ve watched how they sometimes vent to (or sometimes at) each other. What the patrol thinks about “the brass”. I’ve seen why that officer in the rain looks angry as you try to drive around her patrol car. You may hear/seen that too. But I also know some of the WHY. Why do they think that way? Why is that cop so mad when you try to go around her car? The bottom line…they just want to go home safe. They just want to see their spouse, kids or parents after a long shift. They just want to make it through the day without having the hassle of giving you a ticket. And NO, they really do not want to give you a ticket. They would much rather you drive safely.

She died with no one there who loved her. No one in the last few minutes to utter her last words to. And it happens alot more than it should (161 deaths in 2010).

But this one is especially close to me. The Clark County Sheriff’s Office was one of the first local agencies to believe in me and my mission to support officers and firefighters. I did not know her, but she kew something about me. She read my note on the holidays. She knew that Dr. Mike was there. And that someone gave a darn that she was out there. On the holidays, in the rain, in the snow, in the cold, in the hot summer sun, after tornadoes. In court on days off, working odd shifts to cover for sick co-workers. Someone cared that she was giving up time with her family to protect countless other families.

So I stand up for them. That’s what I do. And I’ll do it until the day that I die. And if that’s not acceptable to you, then you can feel free to ignore, avoid or unfriend me. That’s your choice. But I’m going to stand up for them.

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic and Fire personnel – Merry Christmas

First, I want to say thank you to all the Chiefs, Sheriffs and administrators who have made it possible for me to distribute this message.

This marks the second Christmas season that I have sent out emails. In 2008, I decided that no Police Officer, Paramedic, or Fire Fighter will ever serve, protect and defend through a holiday and not know that they are appreciated by someone. As I reflect on the experiences that have come from doing this, I must say that my life is fuller because of it. For those of you who I have met personally, rode in a car with, and celebrated birthdays with, it’s been some really good times. And as I continue my mission to make sure you feel appreciated, I look forward to meeting and spending time with more of you.

I wish you and your families a Merry Christmas and Happy Holiday Season. I know most of you will be working during the holidays. Whether you are dispatching, in a patrol car, or a fire truck, you will spend part of the holidays away from your family. A lot of people do not understand that kind of sacrifice and dedication. You are out there keeping us safe so we can have a happy holiday season with our families. You are out in the cold, the rain, snow, driving to work while most people are sleeping in, or celebrating with family and friends.

I want to say, THANK YOU. Words can not express the gratitude that I have. But not just myself. Don’t forget that there are lots of other people who feel that way. You just may not hear it. I think that is unfortunate that you do not hear it more often than you do, but thank you. Thank you for putting on a uniform everyday. Thank you for being ready to answer a call, even on Christmas. Thank you for checking those hoses, shining those trucks or checking that light bar, and strapping on your duty belt. Those mundane tasks that you do everyday, now on one of the most important holidays of the year. Thank you. As my family sits down to our dinner, or open our gifts, know that you will be thought of at that time, and your sacrifices honored. Please express my appreciation for you to your families.

And, as I’ve noted before, the holidays can be a time of sadness, frustration or depression. It can be hard to balance out what you have to deal with and still know that there are great people in society as well. If you find yourself struggling in this holiday season, don’t hesitate to reach out for assistance. Your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, any other Supervisor, clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can. Call us, grab us after roll call, send an email. Reach out if you need to.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays. I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Please distribute to all Police, Paramedic and Fire personnel – Happy Thanksgiving

Thank you again for allowing me the opportunity to speak with you.

Thanksgiving 2010 will soon be here. Another year is soon coming to a close. I just want to talk a little about adversity. I can almost hear you ask, “Why would we hear about adversity on Thanksgiving?” For starters, if you’re reading this note, you have survived. People and circumstances threw their best at you and you came out on top. You might have received some bumps and bruises along the way, but your here. And you get to fight another day. That bullet meant for you missed its target. That building should have collapsed but didn’t. All the things that could have gone wrong didn’t. Adversity evokes dormant potential within us that could not be awakened otherwise. And if this statement is true for anyone, it’s true for you. Rushing INTO burning buildings. Maintaining composure to return fire when fired upon. Having to talk to relatives after a horrible accident. I’m amazed not only by what you do on a regular basis, but the strength, composure and dedication with which you do it.

There are battles you fight in your individual lives that might make the job pale in comparison. Sometimes “off-duty” things can be just as hard (or harder) to deal with. Departments and communities coming together after a tornado. One officer in my area is fighting cancer, but has been surrounded with love and support from everyone.

It’s been said that no man is an island. Sometimes we forget the impact that our lives have on others. During the holiday season, it can be easy to be discouraged. But every one of us has touched lives that we may never know about. You HAVE made a difference for people.

As I end this note, I’d like to encourage you: Take time to see the difference you have made. Life, with all its ups and downs, is something to be enjoyed and appreciated. And if you have a rough time, your departments may have Employee Assistance Care, Chaplains, Chiefs, supervisors, clergy and/or even friends for guidance and assistance should you need it. I’ll make myself available to help you in any way that I can.

I’ve said it in every email, and every chance I get. I’ve said it to the chiefs and administrators when I contact them. I’ve said it to you on the streets and stores. You all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Please distribute to all Law Enforcement, Paramedic and Fire personnel – 9/11/2010

Distribution: Please distribute to all Law Enforcement, Paramedic and Fire personnel

First, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I can not express my gratitude enough for your assistance. It is an honor to get to write to you and want to thank each of you for the jobs that you do everyday.

As I write this message, we are only a few weeks away from stopping our normal routine to remember those who lost their lives in the attacks that day. Around 3000 people lost their lives that day. 343 firefighters gave their lives that tragic day. In fire stations all over the United States we’ll “remember the 343” for being heroes. 69 officers of the NYPD and PAPD gave their lives that day and more since then due to 9/11 related illness. They will be remembered in police stations across the country as heroes. The more time that I spend with fire and law enforcement personnel, I notice the brotherhood that exists. The sense of brotherhood that recognizes that you might be a firefighter in Dayton, a trooper in Lexington, or EMS in Indiana, that there is a bond that exists between you and other people, people you may never meet, but you consider them a brother/sister anyway. It is truly awesome to see.

Elbert Hubbard is quoted “Our admiration is so given to dead martyrs that we have little time for living heroes.” This is a sad fact of our society, one I’d love to change. We have heroes every day who sit in engines and cruisers and ambulances, which get far less admiration than they deserve. I hope each of you receive an outpouring of appreciation. I hope that people see you in stores and restaurants and pick up your bill. I hope you again hear the cheers of the community you protect. I hope that in the midst of your routine, you feel the gratitude and support that you deserve. You have my support and admiration.

I’ve said it in every email, and every chance I get. I’ve said it to the chiefs and administrators when I contact them. I’ve said it to you on the streets and stores. You all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Dr. Mike Crain I, D.Min.
ucraimx AT yahoo.com
http://livingwarfare.blogspot.com/2009/05/faq-who-are-you-and-what-are-you-doing.html
http://www.facebook.com/DoctorMichael
http://www.policelink.com/member/DoctorMike
http://www.firelink.com/member/DoctorMike

Please disseminate to all law enforcement officers – Police Week

Distribution: Please distribute to all law enforcement personnel

First, I want to say thank you to everyone who has made it possible for me to distribute this message. I can not express my gratitude enough for your assistance.

May 9-15 this year is Police Week. It was designated by President Kennedy in “recognition of the service given by the men and women who, night and day, stand guard in our midst to protect us through enforcement of our laws”.

It’s been a tough year so far for law enforcement officers. Law enforcement deaths are up 51%. Now we are coming into a season or remembering our brothers in blue. Some of us are taking time to remember those in our department that were killed in the Line of Duty. Being from Menifee County, KY, Sheriff Fay Little comes to my mind. Sheriff Little was killed while helping at the scene of an fatal shooting when he was struck by a car who could not see him. Having laid down his life for his county, he will be forever remembered as a hero. And that story will be told hundreds of times in different ways for different officers in the coming weeks. In counties, cities and townships all over the United States, we will take time to honor our heroes. And in doing so, we ensure that they are never forgotten.

On a personal level, I am so thankful for each one of you. Thank you for protecting my city, county, state and country. If it were possible, I’d say it to you personally, and individually. Although I will never personally meet some of you, don’t think for a moment that you’re unappreciated. It’s been my driving thought that I want to make sure that there is never an officer in a car or behind a desk that ever wonders if someone cares. You are in my thoughts and prayers.

For all the officers out there reading this, Dr. Mike is praying for a peaceful week for you. Safe traffic stops. I hope people see you in restaurants and pay for your food. I pray for a time of healing for the departments reading this who have had a loss in the last year. I pray that those of you making the trip to Washington will have a safe trip. For those who are making the trip to the wall to honor a fallen brother, safety and healing. But most of all, I hope there is an outpouring of appreciation form the communities that you serve.

I’ve said it before and will say it again, you all are heroes. I don’t know how often you hear it, but I’m certain it’s not nearly enough.

Prayer Challange – Police Officers

On this, the 13th day of 2010, we have already had 9 Line of Duty deaths for officers, bringing the documented total up to 19,984 officers killed in the line of duty. Organizations are uncovering officers from the past everyday, so this month we may reach 20,000 officers in our history.

We have to stop this trend. I’m asking all my friends and family to pray for the next 18 days. Please pray for our police officers, sheriffs, deputies, and troopers. Please pray for their safety and well-being. Pray that the violence that is planned against them will cease (that “no weapon formed against them will prosper”). Pray for peace in our communities. Pray for safety on the highways. Pray that they can eat meals and attend services in peace. Pray that not one officer out there feels alone or forsaken.

And to all my officer friends out there, we’re going to pray. We’re going to see God turn the tide. And if you feel alone, call me.